Johnson, Keith » MS Social Studies

MS Social Studies

Welcome to the Akiba Middle School social studies page. Each and every Monday morning I will post a glimpse of the week for the 6th, 7th, and 8th grade classes. The purpose of the weekly post is to give you a sense of what the students are doing in the social studies classroom. I urge you to subscribe and use the post not just as a means of keeping track of their academic endeavors, but also as a way to cultivate constructive conversations with your children regarding their studies. 
 
Do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns that you may have over the course of the school year. 
 
Mr. Johnson
 

Recent Posts

a glimpse of the week (12/10)

Happy Monday!

Did everyone have a sensational weekend? Well, I had to bring Lorenzo von Matterhorn back out of the hallway closet as the wet weather returned to North Texas yet again. In case you’ve forgotten, back in October I decided to give my umbrella a name as we were spending so much time together. No, I have not been holding a Swiss aristocrat, nobleman, patrician, etc. hostage in my hallway closet, so there is no need to contact the local authorities. I did miss Lorenzo, though. When I carry him by his wooden crook handle, I always fancy myself as Mr. Banks from Mary Poppins. Is that odd? Did anyone run the BMW Dallas Marathon? I must admit that the thought never even crossed my mind, but I have the utmost respect for those who laced up their running shoes and spent their Sunday morning covering 26.2 miles of some of the loveliest areas of the city. As for me, I spent a good deal of my weekend contentedly lounging on the sofa watching the second leg of the Curling World Cup on NBCSN. Don’t judge. Curling is amazing. Who wouldn’t enjoy watching a granite stone weighing between 38 and 44 pounds as it slides on a sheet of ice toward a target area which is segmented into four concentric circles? Sounds exhilarating, right? In case you missed it, the third leg of the Curling World Cup will take place in Jonkoping, Sweden from January 30 to February 3, 2019. The history of the sport can be traced all the way back to 16th century Scotland, so give curling a chance and check it out. Apologies, as I have been extremely long-winded. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?

In the 6th grade, our break from the textbook World Cultures and Geography will continue for one more week as the students push ahead on the North America map project. This assignment will allow the 6th grade students to hone their cartography skills as they create political/physical maps of the North American continent. Sounds fun, right? This assignment requires the students to be diligent, meticulous, and accurate as I can assure you that it is no easy feat to draw and label the St. Lawrence River on a map. For the record, the St. Lawrence River flows in a roughly north-easterly direction, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean and forming the primary drainage outflow of the Great Lakes Basin. It is also part of the international boundary between Ontario, Canada and the U.S. state of New York. Yes, the 6th grade students will have the St. Lawrence River on their maps. Impressive, right? Though this assignment is more than a bit laborious, the students are enjoying themselves immensely. Good times, indeed. I look forward to seeing their completed maps in the very near future.

In the 7th grade, we will push forward in unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. Last week, we wrapped up our discussion on Juan Bautista de las Casas and his 1811 overthrow of the Spanish government of Texas, as well as Jose Gutierrez de Lara and his attempts to create an independent Texas. Both of these men were successful in their efforts, but only temporarily, as both the Casas' Revolt and the Gutierrez-Magee Expedition ended in failure as the Spanish retained firm control of Texas. Good stuff, right? This week, we will discuss Agustin de Iturbide, the Mexican army general, who after switching sides and joining the insurgency, drafted the Plan of Iguala on February 24, 1821. His revolutionary proclamation created the Army of the Three Guarantees and ultimately brought to an end the Mexican War of Independence. With the signing of the Treaty of Cordoba on August 24, 1821, Mexican independence from Spain was established. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #5 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #5 is Road to Revolution, and we will spend considerable time discussing the troubles on the western frontier leading up to the French and Indian War, Britain’s tax policies and their impact on American colonial society, and the events of April 19, 1775 at Lexington and Concord and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. Good stuff, right? This week, we will discuss William Trent, the captain of the Virginia regiment who was commissioned to construct Fort Prince George at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers, known to the Native Americans as the Forks of the Ohio, only to be thwarted by the French. This led Governor Robert Dinwiddie of Virginia to dispatch his militia, led by Lt. Colonel George Washington, and twice they engaged French troops. First, Lt. Colonel Washington and his men surprised a small expedition of French scouts at the Battle of Jumonville Glen, and then Washington and his men attempted to defend a hastily constructed fort in the Battle of Fort Necessity. Needless to say, the outbreak of the French and Indian War is upon us. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

That is all that I have. Have a fantastic week.

Keith

 

 

 

 

a glimpse of the week (12/3)

Happy Monday!

Chag Sameach! May you be blessed with gifts of peace, love, and happiness this Hanukkah, and may you find your home filled with all of the wonder and joy of the Hanukkah season.

Did everyone have a marvelous weekend? If we exclude the Friday night deluge, can we agree that the weather was absolutely sensational this weekend? I actually grilled flank steak in my backyard on Saturday night. Crazy, right? If you’re asking for my opinion, there’s nothing like a thin flank steak. The cut is common in Colombia, where it is known as sobrebarriga, which literally means over the belly, as flank steak is a beef steak cut from the abdominal muscles or lower chest of a cow. That is too much information. Forgive me. Now you know how the students feel, right? The final College Football Playoff rankings were announced over the weekend, and Alabama, Clemson, Notre Dame, and Oklahoma grabbed the top four spots. Were you surprised? I must admit that I expected Ohio St. to edge out Oklahoma for the fourth spot, but I guess the selection committee saw otherwise. Nonetheless, the college football bowl season is upon us, and with forty-one games scheduled to be played between December 15 and January 7, it should be a lot of fun. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?

In the 6th grade, our break from the textbook World Cultures and Geography will continue for a few more weeks as the students push ahead on the North America map project. This assignment will allow the 6th grade students to hone their cartography skills as they create political/physical maps of the North American continent. Sounds fun, right? This assignment requires the students to be diligent, meticulous, and accurate as I can assure you that it is no easy feat to draw and label the Lesser Antilles on a map. For the record, the Lesser Antilles is an archipelago in the Caribbean Sea stretching in a long arc from the Greater Antilles to the northwest and the continent of South America to the south. Yes, the 6th grade students will have the Lesser Antilles on their maps. Impressive, right? Though this assignment is more than a bit arduous, the students are enjoying themselves immensely. Good times, indeed. I look forward to seeing their completed maps in a few weeks’ time.

In the 7th grade, we will push forward in unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. Last week, we wrapped up our discussion on Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, otherwise known as the Father of Mexico. Father Hidalgo worked tirelessly to promote economic activities for the poor and rural people of Mexico as he fought against the exploitation of Native Americans and mestizos by the gachupines, the native Spaniards of Mexico. This culminated in the Grito de Dolores on September 16, 1810, when Father Hidalgo rang the bell of his church and gave the pronunciamiento, or call to arms, that triggered the Mexican War of Independence. Good stuff, right?  This week, we will push forward to Juan Bautista de las Casas and his 1811 overthrow of the Spanish government of Texas, as well as Jose Gutierrez de Lara and his attempts to create an independent Texas. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #5 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #5 is Road to Revolution, and we will spend considerable time discussing the troubles on the western frontier leading up to the French and Indian War, Britain’s tax policies and their impact on American colonial society, and the events of April 19, 1775 at Lexington and Concord and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. Good stuff, right? This week, we will discuss the expedition of Paul Marin de la Malgue, the officer in the French colonial regular troops who was tasked with constructing and garrisoning a chain of forts stretching from the south shore of Lake Erie to the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers, known to the Native Americans as the Forks of the Ohio. Sounds daunting, right? The French occupation of the Ohio Country elicited an immediate response from both the Native American tribes of the region and the English, and Virginia’s Governor Robert Dinwiddie sent Major George Washington to deliver a letter asking that the French vacate the Ohio Country. Do you see the letter drawing forth a favorable French response? Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

That is all that I have. Have a fantastic week.

 

Keith

a glimpse of the week (11/26)

Happy Tuesday!

Did everyone have a spectacular Thanksgiving break? I hope that you were able to celebrate the day in the company of family and friends, and I am quite certain that you found countless reasons to give thanks. On average, Americans consume forty-six million turkeys and fifty million pumpkin pies on Thanksgiving, and an entire guilt-free Thanksgiving meal can total nearly three thousand calories. Wow! My Thanksgiving meal probably totaled closer to five thousand. I’m not kidding. I go big on Thanksgiving. Apparently, the following Friday is the busiest day of the year for the plumbing profession. I’m not making this up. That is an actual statistic. Though difficult to fathom, the first day of December is on Saturday. Really? That means that my second Texas winter is rapidly approaching. How is that possible? I have memories of my first Texas winter being oppressively cold. Is that the standard? If so, I may need to update my woolen cap collection. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?

 In the 6th grade, we are taking a break from the textbook World Cultures and Geography as the students will continue to work on the North America map project. This assignment will allow the 6th grade students to hone their cartography skills as they create political/physical maps of the North American continent. Sounds fun, right? This assignment requires the students to be diligent, meticulous, and accurate as I can assure you that it is no easy feat to draw and label Lake Nicaragua on a map. For the record, Lake Nicaragua is a freshwater lake in western Nicaragua, and it also happens to be the largest lake in Central America. Yes, the 6th grade students will have Lake Nicaragua on their maps. Impressive, right? Though this assignment will be more than a bit arduous, the students are enjoying themselves immensely. Good times, indeed. I look forward to seeing their completed maps in a few weeks’ time.

In the 7th grade, we will push forward in unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. Last week, we wrapped up our discussion on the European Enlightenment and the effect it had on the people of New Spain, the Spanish colony in Mexico, as John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government proved very impactful. This week, we will begin to discuss Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla and his call for Mexican independence from Spanish rule. Father Hidalgo’s cries for liberation, known as the Grito de Dolores, began a movement that after a decade of war would culminate in the Treaty of Cordoba of 1821, establishing Mexico’s independence from Spain at the conclusion of the Mexican War of Independence. From there, we will push forward to the rebellious activities of Philip Nolan and other Texas filibusters, before being introduced to the empresario Stephen F. Austin, considered by many to be the Father of Texas, and his impact on the colonization of Texas. Sounds fun, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #5 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #5 is Road to Revolution, and we will spend considerable time discussing the troubles on the western frontier leading up to the French and Indian War, Britain’s tax policies and their impact on American colonial society, and the events of April 19, 1775 at Lexington and Concord and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. Good stuff, right? This week, we will continue to discuss the French efforts to influence the Native American tribes of the Ohio Country through the expeditions of Pierre-Joseph Celoron, Charles Michel de Langlade, and Paul Marin de la Malgue. The outcomes of these expeditions led the French to being occupying the Ohio Country by constructing forts along the Venango Path to the Forks of the Ohio, and both the Native Americans and the English responded to this threat. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 

That is all that I have. Have a terrific week.

Keith

 

 

 

 

 

a glimpse of the week (11/19)

Happy Monday! 

Did everyone have a magnificent weekend? Thanksgiving is a mere three days hence. Yes, the Thanksgiving countdown continues, and it is beginning to wind down. To be honest, I have been counting the days until Thanksgiving since the 24th of November of last year as it is genuinely one of my favorite day of the year. Safe travels, and I hope that all of you have a truly wonderful holiday. Give thanks, surround yourself with family and friends, eat guilt-free, and watch football. Sounds like a delightful day, right? Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?

In the 6th grade, we are taking a break from the textbook World Cultures and Geography as the students are set to begin work on the North America map project. This assignment will allow the 6th grade students to hone their cartography skills as they create political/physical maps of the North American continent. Sounds fun, right? This assignment will require the students to be diligent, meticulous, and accurate as I can assure you that it is no easy feat to draw and label the Sierra Madre del Sur mountain range on a map. For the record, the Sierra Madre del Sur mountain range is in southern Mexico and extends from Michoacan east to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Oaxaca. Yes, the 6th grade students will have the Sierra Madre del Sur mountain range on their maps. Though this assignment will be more than a bit arduous, I’m certain that the students will enjoy themselves immensely. Good times, indeed. I look forward to seeing their completed maps in a few weeks’ time.

In the 7th grade, we are set to push forward to unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. This week, we will begin to discuss Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla and his call for Mexican independence from Spanish rule. Father Hidalgo’s cries for liberation, known as the Grito de Dolores, began a movement that after a decade of war would culminate in the Treaty of Cordoba of 1821, establishing Mexico’s independence from Spain at the conclusion of the Mexican War of Independence. From there, we will push forward to the rebellious activities of Philip Nolan and other Texas filibusters, before being introduced to the empresario Stephen F. Austin, considered by many to be the Father of Texas, and his impact on the colonization of Texas. Sounds fun, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

In the 8th grade, we are set to push forward to chapter #5 in the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #5 is Road to Revolution, and we will spend considerable time discussing the troubles on the western frontier leading up to the French and Indian War, Britain’s tax policies and their impact on American colonial society, and the events of April 19, 1775 at Lexington and Concord and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.

That is all that I have. Have a tremendous week. Happy Thanksgiving.

Keith

a glimpse of the week (11/12)

Happy Monday!
 
-The soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the solider who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war.
 
General Douglas MacArthur
 
On May 12, 1962, General MacArthur uttered these words in his farewell speech given to the Corps of Cadets at West Point. His words give an unequivocal exemplification of the sacrifices made by the military veterans of the United States Armed Forces, and let us all thank each and every one of them for their service. 
 
Did everyone have a fantastic weekend? There was definitely a chill in the air, right? I liked it, though. Nothing beats a crisp, autumn day, if you're asking for my predilection on the matter. Thanksgiving is a mere ten days hence. Simply thinking about that glorious fourth Thursday of November adds five pounds to my frame, but I'm not complaining. To be honest, I could eat pumpkin pie every day of the week. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, the students are just about to wrap up the chapters #3-4 (Human Geography/People and Culture) review assignment in preparation for this week's test. On Tuesday (11/13), we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the chapters #3-4 (Human Geography/People and Culture) test is scheduled for Friday (11/16). I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will take a break from the textbook World Cultures and Geography as the students will go to work on the North America map project. This assignment will allow the 6th grade students to hone their cartography skills as they create political/physical maps of the North American continent. Sounds fun, right? This assignment will require that the students be incredibly diligent, meticulous, and accurate as I can assure you that it is no easy feat to draw and label the Great Bear Lake on a map. For the record, the Great Bear Lake is on the Arctic Circle in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Though this assignment will be a bit arduous, I'm certain that the students will enjoy themselves immensely. Challenge accepted, right? I look forward to seeing their completed maps in a few weeks time. 
 
In the 7th grade, the students have wrapped up the unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) review assignment in preparation for this week's test. On Monday (11/12), we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) test is scheduled for Wednesday (11/14). I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. The unit will begin with Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla and his call for Mexican independence from Spanish rule. Father Hidalgo's cries for liberation, known as the Grito de Dolores, began a movement that would culminate with the Treaty of Cordoba of 1821, establishing Mexico's independence from Spain at the conclusion of the Mexican War for Independence. From there, we will push forward to the rebellious activities of Philip Nolan and other Texas filibusters, before being introduced to the empresario Stephen F. Austin and his impact on the colonization of Texas. Sounds fun, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 8th grade, the students are just about to wrap up the chapter #4 (Life in the Colonies) review assignment in preparation for this week's test. On Tuesday (11/13), we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the chapter #4 (Life in the Colonies) test is scheduled for Thursday (11/15). I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will push forward to chapter #5 in the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #5 is Road to Revolution, and we will spend considerable time discussing the troubles on the western frontier leading up to the French and Indian War, Britain's tax policies and their impact on American colonial society, and the events of April 19, 1775 at Lexington and Concord and the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
That is all that I have. Have a fabulous week.
 
Keith
 
 
 
 

a glimpse of the week (11/5)

Happy Monday!

Did everyone have a magnificent weekend? The first weekend of November just came to an end. That means we are now four days into the penultimate month of the calendar year. Really? How is that possible? I’m convinced that the torrential rains of last month swept October away in the deluge. How else can it be explained? Some might say that time flies when you’re having fun. Does that explain it? Are we having fun? Some Might Say is my favorite song by the English rock band Oasis. I really hope that Noel and Liam Gallagher can put aside their differences and reunite the band. Yes, I just went off on a tangent, and for that I apologize. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?

In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapters #3 and #4 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #3 is Human Geography, and we will spend considerable time discussing the geography of population, the reasons people move from place to place, the various natural resources and economic systems of the world, as well as the different types of governments that operate on our planet? Good stuff, right? The focus of chapter #4 is People and Culture, and we will spend considerable time discussing culture, which is defined as the shared attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors of a group, as well as how culture develops, changes, and shapes our lives. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. We should have the two chapters wrapped up by the end of the week, and then the students will begin work on the chapters #3-4 (Human Geography/People and Culture) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test.

In the 7th grade, we have wrapped up unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) in our study of the recorded history of Texas, and there will be a brief intermission before we move on to unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood). This week, the students will begin work on the unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. This assignment is to be completed by Monday (11/12), and after an extensive review of the material the unit #2 test is scheduled for Wednesday (11/14). Though the amount of information that we have covered is daunting, I am certain that the students will be more than prepared. Then, it is on to unit #3 (Texas: From Colony, to Republic, to Statehood) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. Good times, right?

In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #4 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #4 is Life in the Colonies, and we will spend considerable time discussing the English Parliamentary tradition and the idea held by English colonists that they had political rights rooted in their country’s history, the different social and economic classes that divided colonial society, the Atlantic slave trade and the effect of slavery in the colonies, as well as the European Enlightenment and its influence on scientific and political thought. Good stuff, right? We should have the chapter wrapped up by the end of the week, and then the students will begin work on the chapter #4 (Life in the Colonies) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test.

That is all that I have. Have a marvelous week.

Keith

a glimpse of the week (9/29)

We Remember Them
 
In the rising of the sun and in its going down, we remember them.
In the blowing of the wind and in the chill of the winter, we remember them.
 
In the opening of the buds and in the rebirth of spring, we remember them.
In the blueness of the sky and in the warmth of summer, we remember them.
 
In the rustling of leaves and in the beauty of autumn, we remember them.
In the beginning of the year and when it ends, we remember them.
 
When we are weary and in need of strength, we remember them.
When we are lost and sick at heart, we remember them.
 
When we have joys we yearn to share, we remember them.
So long as we live, they too shall live, for they are now a part of us, as we remember them. 
 
by Rabbis Sylvan Kamens and Jack Riemer
 
Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapters #3 and #4 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #3 is Human Geography, and we will spend considerable time discussing the geography of population, the reasons people move from place to place, the different natural resources and economic systems of the world, as well as the different types of governments that operate on our planet. Good stuff, right? The focus of chapter #4 is People and Culture, and we will spend considerable time discussing culture, which is defined as the shared attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors of a group, as well as how culture develops, changes, and shapes our lives. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 7th grade, we will push forward in unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. Last week, we wrapped up our discussion of the French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. After he established Ft. Saint Louis on Garcitas Creek in present-day Victoria County, Texas, Cavelier was ambushed and murdered by Pierre Duhaut as he wandered across East Texas in search of the Mississippi River. Making matters worse, the colonists at Ft. Saint Louis were attacked and killed by the Karankawa tribe in Cavelier's absence. Clearly, things did not go well for the French. Only five children survived the massacre, and they were taken captive by the Karankawa tribe until the Spaniard Alonso de Leon ransomed them for horses and tobacco nearly four years later. We discussed the story of the Talon children in class last week, and the students were riveted. It really is an amazing story. This week, we will move on to Father Damian Massanet and the continued construction of Spanish missions in East Texas, leading up to the return of the French. Did you really think that they were just going to give up on La Louisiane? Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 8th grade, the students are set to wrap up the chapter #3 (Colonies Take Root) review assignment in preparation for this week's test. They spent last week hard at work on this endeavor, and I was impressed with the diligence and resolve demonstrated by the students as they reviewed the material and labored on the assignment. On Monday (10/29), we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the chapter #3 (Colonies Take Root) test is scheduled for Wednesday (10/31). Though the amount of information that we have covered is daunting, I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to chapter #4 in the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #4 is Life in the Colonies, and we will spend considerable time discussing the English Parliamentary tradition and the idea held by English colonists that they had political rights rooted in their country's history, the different social and economic classes that divided colonial society, the Atlantic slave trade and the effect of slavery in the colonies, as well as the European Enlightenment and its influence on scientific and political thought. Good stuff, right? 
 
That is all that I have. Have a terrific week.
 
Keith

a glimpse of the week (10/22)

Happy Monday!
 
Did everyone have a sensational weekend? On Sunday, the curtain came down on the State Fair of Texas. It has taken place every year since 1886, except for varying periods during World War I and World War II. That right there is a lot of Dallas history. Did you attend? Unfortunately, the Johnson family didn't make it out to Fair Park this year. Blame it on the rain, yeah, yeah. Do you remember those words, once crooned by Milli Vanilli, the Munich bred R&B duo, on their 1989 album Girl You Know It's True? Milli Vanilli could never be forgotten, right? There will be no mention of the weather in this week's post. I don't want to jinx, curse, or otherwise hex anything. To conclude, I'd like to say GO DODGERS! Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, the students are set to wrap up the chapters #1-2 (Understanding the Earth and Its Peoples/Earth's Interlocking Systems) review assignment in preparation for this week's test. They spent last week hard at work on this endeavor, and I was impressed with the diligence and resolve demonstrated by the students as they reviewed the material and labored on the assignment. On Monday (10/22) and Tuesday (10/23), we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the chapters #1-2 (Understanding the Earth and Its Peoples/Earth's Interlocking Systems) test is scheduled for Thursday (10/25). Though the amount of information that we have covered is daunting, I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to chapter #3 in the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #3 is Human Geography, and we will spend considerable time discussing the geography of population, the reasons people move from place to place, the different natural resources and economic systems of the world, as well as the different types of governments that operate on our planet. Good stuff, right?
 
In the 7th grade, we will push forward in unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. Last week, we began to discuss the French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle. What a name, right? After establishing several French forts in the Great Lakes region, Cavelier and a group of men canoed down the Illinois River to the Mississippi River from Ft. Crevecoeur, located just outside of the present-day city of Peoria, Illinois. Cavelier and his men made it all the way to the Gulf of Mexico, and after returning to Paris to receive permission from King Louis XIV to establish a French colony on the banks of the Mississippi River, Cavelier went on to establish Ft. Saint Louis on Garcitas Creek in present-day Victoria County, Texas. This week, we will continue to discuss the trials and tribulations of Rene-Robert Cavelier and the plight of the French colonists at Ft. Saint Louis, before moving on to the Spanish response to this French threat and their continued construction of missions in Texas. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 8th grade, the students will continue to work on the chapter #3 (Colonies Take Root) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. They began work on this endeavor last week, and I was impressed with the diligence and resolve demonstrated by the students as they reviewed the material and worked on the assignment. They will have a few more days this week to wrap up their work, and the chapter #3 review assignment is to be completed by Monday (10/29). On that particular Monday, we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the chapter #3 (Colonies Take Root) test is scheduled for Wednesday (10/31). Though the amount of material that we have covered is daunting, I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to chapter #4 in the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #4 is Life in the Colonies, and we will spend considerable time discussing the English Parliamentary tradition and the idea held by English colonists that they had political rights rooted in their country's history, the different social and economic classes that divided colonial society, the Atlantic slave trade and the effect of slavery in the colonies, as well as the European Enlightenment and its influence on scientific and political thought. Good stuff, right?
 
That is all that I have. Have a marvelous week.
 
Keith
 
 

a glimpse of the week (10/15)

Happy Monday!
 
Did everyone have a magnificent weekend? I spent mine in the company of Lorenzo von Matterhorn as North Texas was once again on the receiving end of a deluge of precipitation. Sunday was nice, though. No, I did not spend the last few days entertaining a Swiss aristocrat, nobleman, patrician, etc. On the contrary, my weekend was spent in placid solitude. But, in case you missed last week's post, I wrote about having had the inclination to name my umbrella due to our incessant companionship as of late. Thus, I've been spending quite a bit of time with Lorenzo these days. Most would agree that the city of Seattle, Washington has a well-deserved rainy reputation. I can say that, right? To this point of the calendar year, the Emerald City has received 20.76 inches of rain. My wife was born in the city, and she still has fond memories of her Seattle childhood spent wearing rain boots and jumping in puddles. Why would anyone do that? I don't get it. I've told her many times that I could never live in such a wet city, to her dismay. Well, to this point of the calendar year, Dallas has received 40.3 inches of rain. That is not a typo. Crazy, right? I did a bit of research and discovered that Seattle averages 37.49 inches of rain per year. Sounds like a lot of rain, right? Guess what? Dallas averages 37.57 inches of rain per year. What? Are you kidding me? I hereby retract all of my pervious statements demeaning Seattle's rainy reputation. Apologies, as I've been long-winded yet again. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, the students will continue to work on the chapters #1-2 (Understanding the Earth and Its Peoples/Earth's Interlocking Systems) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. They began work on this endeavor last week, and I was impressed with the diligence and resolve demonstrated by the students as they reviewed the material and worked on the assignment. They will have a few more days this week to wrap up their work, and the chapters #1-2 review assignment is to be completed by Monday (10/22). On that particular Monday, we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test, and the chapters #1-2 (Understanding the Earth and Its Peoples/Earth's Interlocking Systems) test is scheduled for Tuesday (10/23). Though the amount of information that we have covered is daunting, I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to chapter #3 in the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #3 is Human Geography, and we will spend considerable time discussing the geography of population, the reasons people move from place to place, the different natural resources and economic systems of the world, as well as the different types of government that operate on our planet. Good stuff, right?
 
In the 7th grade, the students wrapped up the unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) review assignment last week, and on Monday (10/15) we will extensively review the material in preparation for the test. The unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) test is scheduled for Wednesday (10/17), and I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to unit #2 (The French Explore Texas) in our study of the recorded history of Texas. The unit will begin with the arrival of Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, the French explorer who canoed down the Mississippi River from Ft. Crevecoeur in modern-day Illinois and established Ft. St. Louis on Garcitas Creek in present-day Victoria County, Texas. How, you ask, did the Spanish
respond? I guess we'll find out later in the week. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay) in the New World, Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot/King Philip's Wars), as well as the growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? Last week, we wrapped up our discussion on Puritan dissenters (Roger Williams, Anne Marbury Hutchinson, Thomas Hooker, John Wheelwright) and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, and we are now set to move on to the Pequot and King Philip's Wars. From there, we will discuss the growth of the New England (New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut), Middle (New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania), and Southern (Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia) Colonies and officially conclude chapter #3 (Colonies Take Root). Good stuff, indeed. I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
That is all that I have. Have a fantastic week.
 
Keith
 
 

a glimpse of the week (10/8)

Happy Monday!
 
Did everyone have a spectacular weekend? In last week's post, I recollect making the statement that I had reveled in leaving my umbrella in the closet. Well, I brought Lorenzo back out as the wet weather returned to North Texas over the weekend. Yes, I have become so attached to my umbrella that I felt inclined to give it a name. Hence, Lorenzo von Matterhorn has been my constant companion the past few days. Dallas was certainly abuzz with activity this weekend. The 113th edition of the Red River Showdown, the annual Texas/Oklahoma football rivalry game, was played at the Cotton Bowl on Saturday, the State Fair of Texas welcomed thousands of guests to Fair Park as it entered into its second week, the Dallas Stars hosted the Winnipeg Jets at the American Airlines Center as the new NHL season is officially underway, and Taylor Swift played two sold-out concerts at AT&T Stadium. Dallas has it all, right? Did you participate in any of these events? Though my wife and daughter took in the Taylor Swift spectacle out in Arlington, I contentedly lounged on the sofa watching episodes of Love It or List It on HGTV. Don't judge. It is a phenomenal show. I fear that I've been long-winded this week. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapter #2 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #2 is Earth's Interlocking Systems, and we will spend considerable time discussing the layers of our planet and its atmosphere, the movement of tectonic plates, the hydrologic cycle, Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) and how it affects the change of seasons, as well as the climate and vegetation regions of our planet. Good stuff, right? Last week, we wrapped up our discussion on the continental drift theory, Alfred Wegener's proposal that the continents once formed a continuous landmass that he named Pangaea. The students were completely absorbed in the discussion, and their questions were both essential and substantive. This week, we will move on to the hydrologic cycle and the unceasing movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth, before discussing our planet's obliquity and the changing of the seasons. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. We should have the chapter wrapped up by the end of the week, and then the students will begin work on the chapters #1-2 (Understanding the Earth and Its Peoples/Earth's Interlocking Systems) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. 
 
In the 7th grade, the students will continue to work on the unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. They began work on this endeavor last week, and I was impressed with the diligence and resolve demonstrated by the students as they reviewed the material and worked on the assignment. They will have a few more days this week to wrap up their work, and the unit #1 review assignment is to be completed by Friday (10/12). On Friday, we will extensively review the material from the unit in preparation for the test, and the unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) test is scheduled for Monday (10/15). I am quite confident that the students will be more than prepared. Then, we will move on to unit #2 (The French Explore Texas). Good stuff, right? 
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay) in the New World, Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot/King Philip's Wars), as well as the growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? This week, we will wrap up our discussion on Puritan dissenters (Roger Williams, Anne Marbury Hutchinson, Thomas Hooker, John Wheelwright), before moving on to the Pequot and King Philip's Wars. From there, we will discuss the growth of the New England (New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut), Middle (New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania), and Southern (Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia) Colonies and officially conclude the chapter. Good stuff, indeed. I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
That is all that I have. Have a marvelous week.
 
Keith
 
 

a glimpse of the week (10/1)

Happy Wednesday!
 
Did everyone have a magnificent weekend? Were you able to get outdoors and enjoy the brief respite from the rain? Though the forecast calls for thunderstorms later in the week, I've reveled in leaving the umbrella in the closet the past few days. Well, revel may be too strong a word, but it has been nice. Are you ready for the start of the MLB postseason? It's about time, right? The MLB season began way back on March 29, so let's wrap this up. Can the Astros repeat as World Series Champions? Will my beloved Dodgers finally get it done? We will soon find out, as the first game of the Fall Classic is scheduled for Tuesday, October 23. Nice! Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapter #2 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #2 is Earth's Interlocking Systems, and we will spend considerable time discussing the layers of our planet and its atmosphere, the movement of tectonic plates, the hydrologic cycle, Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) and how it affects the seasons, as well as climate and vegetation regions of our planet. Good stuff, right? This week, we will wrap up our discussion on the continental drift theory, Alfred Wegener's proposal that the continents once formed a continuous landmass that he named Pangaea. From there, we will move on to the hydrologic cycle and the unceasing movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth, before discussing our planet's obliquity and the changing of the seasons. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 7th grade, we have wrapped up unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) in our study of the recorded history of Texas, and there will be a brief intermission before we move on to unit #2 (The French Explore Texas). This week, the students will begin work on the unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. This assignment is to be completed by Friday (10/12), and after an extensive review of the material the unit #1 test is scheduled for Monday (10/15). I am certain that the students will be more than prepared. 
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements in the New World (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay), Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot/King Philip's Wars), as well as the growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? This week, we are moving on to the Puritans, members of the Church of England who sought to purify the church of its corruption, as well as the establishment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. From there, we will move on to Puritan dissenters (Roger Williams, Anne Marbury Hutchinson, Thomas Hooker, John Wheelwright) and their role in the decline of religious influence on colonial society. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
That is all that I have. Have a fabulous week.
 
Keith
 
 
 
 

a glimpse of the week (9/24)

Happy Wednesday!
 
Chag Sameach! Did everyone have a fantastic holiday weekend? As we go through the Chal HaMoed, please allow me to wish you a continued joyful and prosperous Sukkot. I read that Dallas has received more than four times the normal amount of rain for the month of September. Crazy, right? Isn't an autumn in Dallas supposed to be characterized by predominantly dry and pleasant weather? Come October, it is my hope that we will all be a bit less waterlogged. Fingers crossed. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapter #2 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #2 is Earth's Interlocking Systems, and we will spend considerable time discussing the layers of our planet and its atmosphere, the movement of tectonic plates, the hydrologic cycle, Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) and how if affects the seasons, as well as the climate and vegetation regions of our planet. Good stuff, right? This week, we will wrap up our discussion on the continental drift theory, Alfred Wegener's proposal that the continents once formed a continuous landmass that he named Pangaea. From there, we will move on to the hydrologic cycle and the unceasing movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth, before discussing our planet's obliquity and the changing of the seasons. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 7th grade, we have wrapped up unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) in our study of the recorded history of Texas, and there will be a brief intermission before we move on to unit #2 (The French Explore Texas). This week, the students will begin work on the unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) review assignment in preparation for the upcoming test. A completion date for this assignment has not yet been determined as we have a few holidays coming up, but I will keep you posted.
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements in the New World (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay), Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot/King Philip's Wars), as well as the growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? This week, we are moving on to the Puritans, members of the Church of England who sought to purify the church of its corruption, as well as the establishment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. From there, we will move on to Puritan dissenters (Roger Williams, Anne Marbury Hutchinson, Thomas Hooker, John Wheelwright) and their role in the decline of religious influence on colonial society. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
That is all that I have. Have a terrific week.
 
Keith

a glimpse of the week (9/17)

Happy Monday!
 
Did everyone have an outstanding weekend? Though the scattered thunderstorms added a bit of risk to any outdoor plans, on the whole I found them to be a lovely couple of days. The autumnal equinox is on Saturday, so the lazy days of summer are very nearly over. It's time to begin thinking about fall wardrobe essentials, right? As Yom Kippur takes place on Tuesday evening, G'Mar Hatima Tova, and may you have an easy fast. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapter #2 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #2 is Earth's Interlocking Systems, and we will spend considerable time discussing the layers of our planet and its atmosphere, the movement of tectonic plates, the hydrologic cycle, Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) and how it affects the seasons, as well as the climate and vegetation regions of our planet. Good stuff, right? This week, we will wrap up our discussion on the layers of the Earth and its atmosphere, and then it is on to plate tectonics, a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of plates, or pieces, of the Earth's lithosphere. We will also discuss the continental drift theory, first hypothesized by Alfred Wegener in the year 1912. Wegener proposed that the continents once formed a continuous landmass, and he gave it the name Pangaea. Sounds interesting, right? From there, we will move on to the hydrologic cycle and the continuous movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth. Good stuff, indeed. I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
In the 7th grade, we will push forward in our study of the recorded history of Texas. After wrapping up our discussion of Hernan Cortes and his conquest of Mexico, we are set to move on to the failed expedition of Panfilo de Narvaez, the Spanish conquistador who sought to explore and colonize Florida. We will also discuss the travels of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca and his search for the Seven Cities of Cibola, Francisco de Coronado and his determined efforts to locate Quivira, as well as Hernando de Soto, the Spaniard who led the first expedition deep into what is now the modern-day United States. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements in the New World (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay), the early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot/King Philip's Wars), Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, as well as the growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? This week, we are moving on the Separatists, otherwise known as the Pilgrims, and the establishment of the Plymouth Colony, the second permanent English settlement in the New World. We will also discuss the significance of the Mayflower Compact, their governing document, as well as Tisquantum, better known as Squanto, who became an early liaison between the Native Americans of New England and the Separatists. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
That is all that I have. Have a sensational week.
 
Keith
 
 

a glimpse of the week (9/12)

Happy Wednesday!
 
Shanah Tovah Umetukah. May this year bring health, happiness, peace, and prosperity to you and your family. Did everyone have a magnificent weekend? Though it is already Wednesday, we still have quite a bit of material to cover over the next few days. Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapter #2 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #2 is Earth's Interlocking Systems, and we will spend considerable time discussing the layers of our planet and its atmosphere, the movement of tectonic plates, the hydrologic cycle, Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) and how it affects the seasons, as well as the climate and vegetation regions of our planet. Good stuff, right? This week, we will wrap up our discussion on the layers of the Earth and its atmosphere, and then it is on to plate tectonics, a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of plates, or pieces, of the Earth's lithosphere. From there, we will transition to the continental drift theory, first hypothesized by Alfred Wegener in the year 1912. Wegener proposed that the continents once formed a continuous landmass, and he gave it the name Pangaea. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
In the 7th grade, we will push forward in our study of the recorded history of Texas as we wrap up our discussion of Hernan Cortes and his conquest of Mexico. From there, we will move on to the failed expedition of Panfilo de Narvaez, the travels of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca as he searched for the Seven Cities of Cibola, and Francisco Vasquez de Coronado's determined efforts to locate Quivira. I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. I am hoping to have the unit wrapped up by the week of (9/24), and we will then begin reviewing for the unit #1 (Columbus Sails to the New World/Spanish Explorers Come to Texas) test. Clearly, we are a few weeks away from scheduling the unit #1 test, but I will keep you posted. 
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements in the New World (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay), the early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot/King Philip's Wars), Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence on colonial society, as well as the growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? This week, we will wrap up the Jamestown Colony with a discussion on John Rolfe, the English colonist who is credited with the first successful cultivation of tobacco as an export crop. Rolfe's efforts generated considerable profits for the colony, and he married Matoaka, better known as Pocahontas, too. Then, we will move on to the Separatists, otherwise known as the Pilgrims, the significance of the Mayflower Compact, their governing document, and the establishment of the Plymouth Colony. Sounds interesting, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
That is all that I have. Have a tremendous week.
 
Keith
 
 

a glimpse of the week (9/3)

Happy Tuesday!
 
Did everyone have a fantastic weekend? It was nice to have the extra day, and I sincerely hope that you made it memorable. As we are now into the month of September, autumn is a mere eighteen days away. To me, autumn means fall colors, cooler temperatures, and football. Sounds good, right? Shall we look ahead to the goings-on for the week?
 
In the 6th grade, we will push forward in chapter #1 of the textbook World Cultures and Geography. The focus of chapter #1 is Understanding the Earth and Its Peoples, and we will spend considerable time discussing the five themes and six essential elements of geography, the technology tools used by geographers, and the many careers that are available in the field of geography. Sounds fun, right? This week, we will wrap up our discussion on the themes and elements of geography, as adopted by the Association of American Geographers. Then, it is on to chapter #2. The focus of chapter #2 is Earth's Interlocking Systems, and we will spend considerable time discussing the layers of our planet, the movement of tectonic plates, the hydrologic cycle, Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) and its affect on the seasons, as well as understanding the difference between weather and climate. Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
In the 7th grade, we will push forward in our study of the recorded history of Texas as we wrap up our discussion of Christopher Columbus and begin to focus on the Spanish colonization of the Mexican peninsula. The four expeditions of Columbus led to the 1519 arrival of the first Spanish conquistadors in the region of North America that would become known as Texas, and this week we will spend considerable time discussing the expedition of Alonso Alvarez de Pineda, the first European to observe the Texas coast. Pineda sent a hand-drawn map of the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico back to the governor of the island of Santiago (Jamaica), and this map set into motion the expedition of none other than Hernan Cortes, the Spaniard whose expedition led to the fall of the Aztec Em[re, Good stuff, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom. 
 
In the 8th grade, we will push forward in chapter #3 of the textbook America: History of Our Nation. The focus of chapter #3 is Colonies Take Root, and we will spend considerable time discussing the first English settlements in the New World (Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay), the early conflicts between English colonists and the Native Americans (Pequot and King Philip's Wars), Puritan dissenters and the decline of religious influence in colonial society, as well as the formation and growth of the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies. Good stuff, right? This week, we will discuss the Jamestown Colony, the first permanent English settlement in North America as established by London's Virginia Company. It certainly wasn't straightforward and trouble-free, but Jamestown did serve as the capital of Virginia for eighty-three years, which is a lot more than can be said about the Lost Colony of Roanoke. Sounds fun, right? I look forward to the lively discussion that is certain to take place in the classroom.
 
That is all that I have. Have an outstanding week.
 
Keith